Tag Archives: business

After the Exit: Second Acts

As part of my effort to add variety to the types of exit planning posts here, I will occasionally include “Second Act”, stories about business owners who have already left one career, and are now doing something else. The Second … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Life After, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Why GenXers Won’t Buy Your Business

There are six reasons why GenXers won’t buy your business. Last week I presented a webinar for the Exit Planning Institute entitled “The Perfect Storm.” It looks at six factors impacting the desire and the ability of Generation X buyers … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Economic Trends, Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Politics and Regulation, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Why GenXers Won’t Buy Your Business

  1. David Cunningham says:

    John, the video is a compelling review of the events that have created our exit dilemma. I would add the impact that automation will have on our consumer driven economy, when workers are displaced and the population can no longer buy what the robots build. A more immediate challenge is that companies like Amazon and Uber have used high risk investment dollars to provide superior service at lower cost without a current imperative to make a profit. The end result will be those companies becoming monopolies, eliminating SMBs. Millenials can see the writing on this wall.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Good points, David. Both job displacement and the Internet come under the general heading of Disintermediation (the elimination of the person in the middle) and none of us can stand up to the Internet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Quality of Earnings Part 3: Cash Flow

In the past few weeks we’ve discussed how quality of earnings audits look at your income and expenses, and their impact on company value.  Since Revenue less Expenses equals Profit (P=R-E), you could be forgiven for thinking that we have picked … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Quality of Earnings Part 3: Cash Flow

  1. Marsha Kelly says:

    Great detailed advice. Cash flow can make or break a small business. I know from my own experience and that of my clients. Run rates are a complex but necessary calculation.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Quality of Earnings Part 2: Hidden Expenses

In my last post we discussed quality of earnings audits from a revenue perspective. Customer concentration, marginal lines of business and contracts are the three most common revenue traps. If you are comfortable with your company’s strength and stability as … Continue reading

Posted in Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Exiting a Family Business: Three Questions

Transitioning a Family Business has special issues. This interview was reprinted last week in the newsletter of Steven Bankler, CPA. We asked San Antonio business consultant John F. Dini, one of the nation’s leading experts on business ownership and exit … Continue reading

Posted in Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Leadership, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Exiting a Family Business: Three Questions

  1. David Basri says:

    I have read these columns for years. Enough with the exit planning already. Most of us are out here trying to succeed, not leave,

    • John F. Dini says:

      Thanks David. I know you’ve been a loyal reader for years, and I appreciate your comments. They’ve always been well-considered and erudite, if not necessarily in agreement with mine!

      I guess you missed my post on February 12th. I read somewhere that “A particular strength is using a variety of technologies to bring separate systems together into a coherent solution.” In my case, I was fielding requests for articles and speaking on multiple topics, blogging on a variety of subjects, developing planning tools for advisors and consulting on ownership transitions. Too much work for diffused results. It was time to get focused.

      I’d hate to lose you, but exit planning is what it’s gonna be…

  2. Ron Bento says:

    Wow – good article and good comments in response. Exit planning is very similar to planning a football game. One can not just field a team and see what happens if the intent is to win. One must anticipate the opponent. Plan and execute a play script at the start to see if your player skill and play strategy can adequately defeat, and with how much difficulty. Personally, I really enjoy reading about exiting regularly because it is practice. I remember Coach Lombardi mostly for saying, “It is not practice that makes perfect – it is perfect practice that makes perfect.” This is how we succeed today – by anticipation of and preparation for the leave.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *