Tag Archives: business

Choosing Not to Maximize Profits

The other day, a client asked me to review some questions from an MBA student studying business ownership. One of the questions was “Are you doing everything possible to maximize profits?” I’ve seen the same question asked in a number … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Incentives, Managing Employees, Marketing, Sales, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Choosing Not to Maximize Profits

  1. Ed Pratesi says:

    John,

    I agree with your premise, what the question should be is “Are you maximizing value?”

    The very choices made by business owners include many of the above that lead not to short term profits but “hopefully” sustainable value.

  2. Frank Arnold says:

    John,

    Well said and of course there is the issue of reinvesting in the business for sustaining and growing profits, but over the long haul.

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What Should A Small Business Insure?

Every business carries insurance. Some is required by law, such as unemployment insurance or coverage on vehicles. Most is optional, but there is “common sense” coverage and more esoteric policies intended to help you recover from company-threatening events. I’ll spend the … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to What Should A Small Business Insure?

  1. Richard Hummel says:

    Great reminders. Falls under the category of continuity planning which is vital for most family businesses…at least mine.

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The New Information Direction: Push Over Pull

Ever since we started using computers in virtually every business, we’ve been putting data into them. Unfortunately, the issue has been getting information back out. In the middle 1980’s I ran a manufacturing company together with a couple of Australians. They thought … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Managing Employees, Marketing and Sales, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to The New Information Direction: Push Over Pull

  1. Mike Wright says:

    We built a company around this in the 90’S. What we need now is for the computer to tell the recipient of the information what they should do with it. Then we will have actionable information. Very Interesting!

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Is Two Weeks Fair Notice?

I formerly employed an assistant who held a Masters Degree in Human Resources. On occasion she’d say “I love working here. I’ll never quit.” Of course, as a good employer I felt an urge to reply with equal commitment, but … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

5 Responses to Is Two Weeks Fair Notice?

  1. David Basri says:

    The article has a lot of prudent advice. However, if you added up the total number of times employees have lost jobs without fair notice or reason, and the number of times employers have had employees leave without fair notice or reason, it is not clear that employers would end up with the short end of that stick. The truth is that without mutual respect either party may treat the other poorly. It is because of mutual respect that you and your past employee parted on good terms. When employment is mutually beneficial and mutually satisfying, it will end appropriately even when the termination is inconvenient for one or the other.

  2. Mike Wright says:

    It is always important to outline in advance how a business relationship will end; Rather it is an employee, vendor or partner.

  3. Shouldn’t it be a two-way street?

  4. Greg says:

    The laws today that protect employees in these situations are fair. Companies need to understand that employee loyalty (or lack of) is a product of their own making. When an employee puts their notice in, they’ve been ready to leave for awhile. You protect your investment in employees by making sure the investment continues to work for both parties. When it no longer does, you’re welcome to part ways if it’s for the right reasons.

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Extreme Democracy

Last week the British government announced that it was naming their new scientific research ship the RSS Sir David Attenborough, acting counter to the  people’s selection of “Boaty McBoatface,” despite that name being an overwhelming 3:1 favorite over the next closest choice. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Extreme Democracy

  1. Great post. Furthering this conversation, I highly recommended Dan Kennedys book: No B.S. Ruthless Management of People & Profits…..a word of warning you will need some thick skin, some honest self evaluation, and Clarity to really appreciate the valuable lessons taught in this book.

  2. David Basri says:

    Here, here! (with respect to our British forebearers).

  3. Martin Frey says:

    Well said. True freedom comes when we are obedient and submit to something greater than ourselves. Human are funny animal in search of transcendental joy yet they typically look for it in “things” and fleeting pleasures.

  4. Chris Christianson says:

    Very well said. Not all are qualified to lead and thus should be grateful to those that are!

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