Tag Archives: employees

Internal Transfers: Legacy vs. Lucre

Lifestyle vs. Legacy Why would I refer to the results of an internal transfer as “lifestyle vs. lucre?” Lucre is a pejorative term. While it is technically just a synonym for money, most dictionaries draw the parallel to its use in … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Leadership, Managing Employees, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Internal Transfers: Legacy vs. Lucre

  1. Edward Lette says:

    John,
    I have seen this happen in leveraged ESOP transactions which is so sad.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Yes Ed, That’s clearly why the Department of Labor is so much more likely to find issues in ESOPs where an employee is the trustee. It is often a warning sign of influence on valuation by the seller.

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The Right Price for Your Business

“If someone offered me the right price, I’d sell in a minute!” Exit planners and business brokers hear it all the time. “Anything is for sale if the price is right!” What is the “right” price? Of course, you can … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to The Right Price for Your Business

  1. Becca Holton says:

    It makes sense why the right price is what you can get. I feel like that can be a little frustrating. However, I assume with right kind of help you can still get a decent price for your business.

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After the Exit; “Nothing Will Change”

“Nothing will change.” It is almost de rigueur for an acquirer to include that in his or her opening comments to the incumbent staff of a just-purchased business. Sometimes it is the seller’s attempt at making folks feel better. “Don’t … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Incentives, Leadership, Life After, Managing Employees, Selling a business | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to After the Exit; “Nothing Will Change”

  1. John Hyman says:

    Yeah, and I promise to spend the night! This is a terrific observation and the counsel to be upfront and smooth the anxiety is spot on.

  2. Marsha Kelly says:

    You tell the truth. Things should change when a business is sold so it can grow on to new heights, in new and different ways. http://best4businesses.com/legal/legalzoom-referral-code-review/

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Business isn’t Zero Sum

In any negotiation, you can assume a win-win solution or a zero sum outcome. “Win-win” is defined as when both parties come out ahead or achieve what they seek. “Zero sum” is when the premise behind negotiation is that whatever one … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Entrepreneurship, Incentives, John's Opinions, Managing Employees, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Business isn’t Zero Sum

  1. Mike Wright says:

    Very good points. Unfortunately we have become very short term and self centered thinkers. Those with the greatest economic or political power will do what is necessary to gain and retain their control. This creates sub-optimal binary states that we fluctuate between rather than making long term gains for all.

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Stop Managing

Why would anyone advise business owners to stop managing? Management is a proven science. From the time and motion studies of Frederick Winslow Taylor in the late 1800s, to Matthew Kelly and Patrick Lencione’s Dream Manager, we are constantly in … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Stop Managing

  1. Ed Bierschenk says:

    Great summary of the panel session. I was in the audience for the panel and it was clear that business owners need to be more willing to let go and delegate more to a qualified 2nd in command. Like, John, I would encourage owners to consider upscaling their next hire into a more qualified candidate who can assume a strategic competency as a GM, Operations Manager, or even 2nd in-training. This is a high leverage investment which will allow more time for “working on the business.” TAB Business Coach-

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