Tag Archives: employees

The Disconnect Between Skills and Jobs

A Gallup/Lumina Foundation Poll released a few weeks ago is getting attention in the business community. In a survey of 623 business leaders, most said that higher education was important, but where an employee earned a degree, and what the degree … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to The Disconnect Between Skills and Jobs

  1. Rod Giles says:

    I am also aware that a very large nimber of successful companies are started by people that have no particular education but have a belief in themselves and their abilities and go ahead in the wider marketplace in spite of ” no education” . In fact in my experience I have seen may qualified people totally able to think productively for themselves. I have also seen many untrained and uneducated personal really achive if given the right support and oportunity. I therefor do not believe there is a hard and fast rule but a need to really have a very good look at what is wanted and expected and chose the right cloth for the right suit and not just stick to one size fits all.
    Further to this is that I think that the young are sold the idea that a education is going to give them the right to a job of their wish and a good education will gaurentee a salary to suit. However there are not enough positions available any longer as the world become increasingly more crowded with quailfied graduates , less jobs and more automation.
    Given this situation the responsibilty of choosing the right person it is becoming more clouded.

  2. Mike Havel says:

    It sure would be a step in the right direction, if the Public Colleges would direct our tax payers $$ into degrees programs for which there are jobs, and reduce the $$ in degrees programs for which there are few jobs. Just like a business they should try to created an inventory of graduates that can be sold, make a good living, pay taxes, and donate back to their college. If someone wants to study in field in which their are few jobs, let then go to a private college. We do not need to be using our tax $$$ educating citizens into a field which there are no jobs.

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Empowerment Requires Encouragement

We all want employees who are empowered to think. That doesn’t always turn out the way we hoped. Last week the news feeds carried a story about a Girl Scout in San Francisco who set up her cookie table in front … Continue reading

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4 Responses to Empowerment Requires Encouragement

  1. Hi John,
    I think few business owners would call micromanagement a good thing, if you put it in those terms. The trouble is finding the balance between delegation that keeps your business strong and creates a product you can continue to be proud of and realizing that all of this does require some amount of letting go. I’ve left this comment over in the BizSugar community as well where Christi Brendlinger was good enough to share this post. Wonder if you or she or both could share some guidelines with our community about exactly how you go about striking this difficult balance.

    • John F. Dini says:

      It’s a great question, Heather. I think there may only be a state of imbalance. Either you are giving employees too much leeway, and suffering the occasional setback because of it, or you are trying to avoid the setbacks, and reining them in. The “balance” lies in determining how much of a mistake a company can afford in the name of learning.

  2. Pingback: In Our Community: Unlocking Potential, Empowering Your Team and More

  3. Pingback: In Our Community: Unlocking Potential, Empowering Your Team and More - KidsProfitOnline.com

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Four Generations’ Embrace of Technology

Technology is pervasive in the workplace. That isn’t a news flash; it’s just reality. When we have an IT or Internet malfunction, my employees are probably less than 20% as effective without their computers. They will catch up on some … Continue reading

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Employee “Rights” in the Workplace

The 14th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, the “Due Process” amendment, is one of the most-litigated sections of that document. It is also the only one that specifically abrogates rights, broadly removing the right to vote or hold … Continue reading

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Employee Retention: From Thirty Years to Two

The United States has never been known for permanent employment. The flexibility of our job market, the ability of employers to hire the employees need and fire those they don’t, has always been considered by economists to be a core attribute … Continue reading

Posted in Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Employee Retention: From Thirty Years to Two

  1. cathy locke says:

    John,
    Thanks for the article, I am a “baby boomer” and agree totally! I was laid off after 6.5 years and after a year of being a ” you are too qualified for the position”, I decided to do something I could enjoy, and taught myself how to become a wholesale/retail Chocolatier! I have 4 years in the “business” and am finally growing and have learned a lot the hard way and I am more unique and happy. I do have 2 part time assistants that I feel will work,learn,grow with my company…but nothing is permanent so each day is a new door that I can open and enjoy the challenge. Thanks again!
    Cathy

  2. Zbig Skiba says:

    Good blog, John. Per studies, money is well down the list of reasons for employee retention. If I’m not mistaken the employees relationship with their direct manager is #1, followed by other factors such as company culture, ability to learn, their passion for the company mission, etc. So retention boils down to doing some tough work around making your workplace an appealing place to come every day, rather a place to dread. That’s not as easy as it sounds, for a small business person who focuses on meeting his payroll.

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