Tag Archives: promotion

The New Information Direction: Push Over Pull

Ever since we started using computers in virtually every business, we’ve been putting data into them. Unfortunately, the issue has been getting information back out. In the middle 1980’s I ran a manufacturing company together with a couple of Australians. They thought … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Managing Employees, Marketing and Sales, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to The New Information Direction: Push Over Pull

  1. Mike Wright says:

    We built a company around this in the 90’S. What we need now is for the computer to tell the recipient of the information what they should do with it. Then we will have actionable information. Very Interesting!

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What Does HR Do?

What are the roles of a Human Resources professional in your organization? A common rule of thumb is that a company should have a dedicated HR function once it reaches 80 employees or so. This post comes from a recent meeting of … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to What Does HR Do?

  1. John Vena says:

    I think you have done a good job describing most aspects of the role of an HR professional, but you haven’t touched upon “discipline”. In our organization, 60 plus employees, we use an HR contractor. In addition to those areas mentioned, a large amount of their time is spent supporting supervisors and department heads on how to respond to issues ranging from harassment claims to customer service complaints, attendance and general behavior problems. You haven’t addressed activities such as tracking discipline, conducting investigations, coaching managers and employees with policy or behavior infractions. Would you assign such tasks to the HR role as described by your “peer group”.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Excellent point, John. I don’t think it is appropriate to have HR actually conduct discipline, but making sure it is complaint with both government and policy, administered even-handedly, and that management is supported when claims arise should certainly be in there. Perhaps the group just doesn’t have any discipline problems. (wink)

  2. Hi John,
    It is true, that, HR activities are very important if you grow, Choosing and Hiring qualified leads are crucial.
    Thank you for sharing your knowledge unto us.
    I really appreciate your work. Great job and Keep it up John! 🙂

  3. John says:

    Or, if you don’t want to worry about hiring a skill you have never hired before, and having a single role with nobody for that person to learn from, consider outsourcing those administrative, process and systems to experts you don’t want to “buy” in your small business. Also, outsourcing allows you to get the critical work done, by fully qualified professionals, without carrying non-revenue generating employees. Hence the birth of the PEO! We are growing like crazy because owners know they their time is better spen focused on profit and growth!

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Small Businesses Fantasies: Service

As an evangelist for small business, I am the consumer equivalent of the locally-grown food movement. I spend as much of my discretionary income as possible with the owned-and-operated businesses in my area. As a consultant and coach to owners, I also … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees, Marketing, Marketing and Sales, Sales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Small Businesses Fantasies: Service

  1. David Basri says:

    Even if you work on it every day, if you do not do it well the effort is still wasted.

  2. Francine DiFilippo says:

    people have stopped investing in training and expect their employees to intuitively “know” these things. not possible. Really caring is just not that common.

  3. Rob Kaufman says:

    Service is a nebulous term. It has a different definition whether it comes from the provider or the customer. What supersedes service is the experience from the customer’s standpoint. Today’s independent business owner has a great opportunity to differentiate itself from its competitors. Unfortunately, many do not know how to do this.

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“Congratulations — You are the Low Bidder!”

The sentence that titles this post could be defined as the epitome of mixed emotions for a business owner. You won the business, but only because you are willing to work for less than everyone else. Perhaps you deliberately cut … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Marketing, Marketing and Sales, Sales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to “Congratulations — You are the Low Bidder!”

  1. John Hyman says:

    Price is seldom an issue when service, quality, and consistency are provided. But perspective and experience is huge. The airline industry has been taking advantage of their customers for years because we have little choice and have to travel.

    On a Delta flight from Dallas to Seattle a few years ago, a packed Boeing 757, the woman sitting in the middle seat next to me raised her hand, to get the attention of the flight attendant doing her cabin pre-flight check. “Where is the olive oil” she asked loud enough for the majority of the other passengers to overhear. When the flight attendant approached our aisle, with a puzzled look, the woman commented “are sardines always packed in olive oil?” The cabin erupted with laughter and agreement.

    Leaders with a vision like Herb Kelleher are very unique. And you are spot on in your observations about how well they deliver on their promise.

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The Quest for Recurring Revenue

Recurring revenue is the current Holy Grail of business. Barriers to Entry, a traditional way of assessing your differentiation against competition, have been replaced by Barriers to Exit, how to make it at least inconvenient or at most excruciatingly painful for … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Economic Trends, Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Marketing and Sales, Sales, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to The Quest for Recurring Revenue

  1. I am striving to achieve different recurring revenue streams over time, so I will check out the book, The Automatic Customer by John Warrillow.

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