Tag Archives: recession

Customer Service Starts with “Hello.”

When asked what differentiates their businesses from giant competitors, most owners will describe their relationship with customers. “We give better service.” “Our employees know our customers by name.” “We treat people as individuals.” What constitutes excellent service differs by industry … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Customer Relations, Managing Employees, Marketing, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Customer Service Starts with “Hello.”

  1. candi says:

    Great article and so true!

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Leaner and Meaner (Part 2): Retaining Good Employees

Last week we discussed the post-recession challenges that face business owners, and the economic and demographic shifts that mean we need to run our companies better than we ever have before. Between 2008 and 2010 many business owners faced a task they had … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Leaner and Meaner (Part 2): Retaining Good Employees

  1. Stan Wyner says:

    Recruiting, retention, and downsizing should be done within the context of an overall succession plan designed not only for ownership transitions, but also “bench strength.”

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Atlas Shrugged and the Imperial Presidency

“Atlas Shrugged – Part II” was released on Friday. Those of you who read this column regularly know that I’m a fan of Ayn Rand, although I place myself far short of devout Objectivism. I’ve sported “Who is John Galt?” license plate … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, John's Opinions, Politics and Regulation, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Atlas Shrugged and the Imperial Presidency

  1. Government is a business, albeit a monopoly on certain items like defense but it too has all the charateristics of an operating business. No surprise if it should also devour competition to be the sole provider.

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Employee Motivation: The Effect of the Economy

In 1979, President Jimmy Carter delivered his “Crisis of Confidence” speech, commonly referred to as his “Malaise Speech” although he never actually used that word. To a country reeling from stagflation and an oil crisis, it was an additional blow to … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

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Employees aren’t Partners

Many of my clients are recovering from the recession. They are running lean, and have restored their profitability, even if at lower revenues than prior to 2008. Those that had to reduce or freeze employee compensation are seeking ways to … Continue reading

Posted in Incentives, John's Opinions, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Employees aren’t Partners

  1. Ted Reynolds says:

    This is an excellent article and I completely agree with the concept that only Exectuive Mgmt should profit share. Incentive based pay for the employees is a good practice, but needs to have flexibility to ebb and flow with the needs of the business being met first and foremost.

  2. Larry Amon says:

    John, I disagree. I used profit sharing with my employees for 15 years. Each employee in my company contributed to the profits of the company. We were a maufacturing company and everyone contributed, not just the managers. We did set up a system whereby each employee’s share of the profit was based on compensation, years of service, and a performance factor. We met monthly with all employees and reviewed our financials with them. They knew where they could help by controlling expenses and where they could cut costs. they knew the cost of the materials that they were using in the process and could increase the yield and productivity of the operation. When the company was sold the employees were given over $500,000 to be dived up according to the previous criteria. After 25 years they are still there.

    • John F. Dini says:

      That sounds lile a great system, Larry. I note you said “performance” was a key criteria. I have absolutely no problem with using company profitability as a funding scale for incentive programs. My piece criticised companies that distribute profits as an entitlement, without defining what individuals need to do to earn their share.

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