Tag Archives: business ownership

What Does HR Do?

What are the roles of a Human Resources professional in your organization? A common rule of thumb is that a company should have a dedicated HR function once it reaches 80 employees or so. This post comes from a recent meeting of … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to What Does HR Do?

  1. John Vena says:

    I think you have done a good job describing most aspects of the role of an HR professional, but you haven’t touched upon “discipline”. In our organization, 60 plus employees, we use an HR contractor. In addition to those areas mentioned, a large amount of their time is spent supporting supervisors and department heads on how to respond to issues ranging from harassment claims to customer service complaints, attendance and general behavior problems. You haven’t addressed activities such as tracking discipline, conducting investigations, coaching managers and employees with policy or behavior infractions. Would you assign such tasks to the HR role as described by your “peer group”.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Excellent point, John. I don’t think it is appropriate to have HR actually conduct discipline, but making sure it is complaint with both government and policy, administered even-handedly, and that management is supported when claims arise should certainly be in there. Perhaps the group just doesn’t have any discipline problems. (wink)

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Too Busy to Do Business

Another tax filing season has passed, and the entire US accounting profession comes up for air. Of course, thousands of businesses and individuals have filed for extensions, thereby postponing the pain of calculating their final numbers for anywhere from a … Continue reading

Posted in Exit Planning, Leadership, Politics and Regulation, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Too Busy to Do Business

  1. Dan Bowser says:

    I love the title. When I was more active in my consulting practice and looking for additional clients, my best prospecting time was tax season. Business owners were unwilling to wait for advice and guidance. As a result, they left their CPA do the tax work and looked to me for the lucrative strategic planning and implementation. I love tax season.

  2. Mike Wright says:

    Excellent. Another thing to think about when I hear politicians talk about helping small business, and I know they have no concept of what small business is about.

  3. Ann says:

    Hi John,
    Great posts !
    Very interesting article thank you for posting !

  4. Great post John! I actually had a very similar conversation with a business owner only a couple of days ago on this topic. In Canada, our tax deadline is April 30th, so we have another week of our accountants being unavailable. You also hear so much about them working 80 hours a week, getting no sleep, rushing to meet deadlines, that it also begs the question as to how many mistakes are happening? Not intentionally, but only because of the time crunch and the pressure of the deadline. Realistically, as everyone talks about “added value” in our industry, you know that at tax time, this certainly isn’t happening.

    I agree with you that the governments need to come up with a new system for tax filing deadlines and not make it universally the same for every person. We’ve done it for businesses and base it on their fiscal year end, so why can’t it also be done for individuals?
    Thanks for a great read!

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Small Businesses Fantasies: Service

As an evangelist for small business, I am the consumer equivalent of the locally-grown food movement. I spend as much of my discretionary income as possible with the owned-and-operated businesses in my area. As a consultant and coach to owners, I also … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees, Marketing, Marketing and Sales, Sales | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Small Businesses Fantasies: Service

  1. David Basri says:

    Even if you work on it every day, if you do not do it well the effort is still wasted.

  2. Francine DiFilippo says:

    people have stopped investing in training and expect their employees to intuitively “know” these things. not possible. Really caring is just not that common.

  3. Rob Kaufman says:

    Service is a nebulous term. It has a different definition whether it comes from the provider or the customer. What supersedes service is the experience from the customer’s standpoint. Today’s independent business owner has a great opportunity to differentiate itself from its competitors. Unfortunately, many do not know how to do this.

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Let the Business Owners Pay for It

When it comes to “No taxation without representation,” the rallying cry of our founding fathers, few identifiable population segments are as abused as business owners. One of my long-time clients is a franchisor, and until very recently I was a … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Entrepreneurship, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Let the Business Owners Pay for It

  1. Maryanne Guido says:

    Working with the City and County we are required to submit certified payroll, ensure our subcontractors submit THEIR certified payroll, and that subs certified they have been paid by us on a monthly basis. If sun fails to do do any of this the GC (we) do not get paid until we “make” each sub comply- or do it for them.

  2. Joani Gill says:

    John thanks for citing a few regulations that hinder business growth for small businesses. I believe our middle market companies suffer the same issues as they fight for their rights to thrive. Just a few years ago, The Association for Corporate Growth, a global organization focused on the middle market, began a grass roots campaign to become the voice on Capital Hill for this business sector. I urge readers to check out ACG.ORG or MIDDLEMARKETVOICE.ORG and see where they can help with this initiative and be heard collectively. CONTACT AMBER LANDIS, VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC POLICY, AT ALANDIS@ACG.ORG.

  3. When is it time to get rid of the red tape and bureaucrats?

  4. Cathy Locke says:

    Since I am a small business and mainly wholesale to small and medium size businesses I honestly don’t feel I have a “snowball in hell” chance of making ends meet or even show a profit. I also feel we need to clean house with the red tape and bureaucrats.

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Time to Grow Up

Young industries no longer have the time to grow up. The cycle of maturation has long been accepted as  a fact of life when a new concept becomes a business. There are a few pioneers (defined here in Texas as … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Marketing and Sales, Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Time to Grow Up

  1. John Meetz says:

    WOW what are we doing in the TAB business? Are board meetings and coaching sessions obsolete? Maybe they should all be done on SKYPE! Is the ExitMap engagement a dream beyond the basic assessment, appraisal, and action reports – do they really have time or want a consultant in the process?

    • John F. Dini says:

      John,
      Most TAB members have no intention of building a national market-dominating player. As I said in the beginning of the piece, there’s always room for hundreds of differentiated small companies. In the past, some of those would grow up to be regional players, then national ones. The odds of that happening are much longer now.

  2. Richard H says:

    Couldn’t possibly disagree more. I assume that’s the response you were expecting.

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