Tag Archives: selling a business

Business Buyers: The “Buy Now, Pay Later” Generation

If you are preparing to sell your business, your buyers will likely be members of the “buy now, pay later” generation. Generation X is the first demographic group to be raised in a culture that put little emphasis on savings. … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Business Buyers: The “Buy Now, Pay Later” Generation

  1. This is one of the most realistic articles I’ve read on the topic. Sellers would be wise to listen to their advisors, and be advised earlier than they think they should.

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Ownership Transfer and Employee Security

When we start planning for the sale of a company, many owners ask me about sharing information with employees. They are naturally concerned that an ownership transfer will cause their workers to seek more secure positions elsewhere. This is true whether … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Exit Planning, Incentives, Leadership, Managing Employees, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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Is Your Business Built on Individual Heroics?

Great employees are a wonderful gift, but individual heroics aren’t healthy for your business. Someday, you will start thinking about leaving the business. Perhaps you already do. When you begin planning for your transition, what will your company systems sound like … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Leadership, Managing Employees, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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Good Customers Can Be Bad

When can good customers be bad? What could be wrong with a customer who buys a lot, pays promptly, and never has a service problem? They might be buying too much. No matter how strong or comfortable a sales relationship is, … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Marketing and Sales, Sales, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Good Customers Can Be Bad

  1. allen james says:

    exactly i was thinking a day ago when i faced this problem

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The Immortal Business Goes on Forever

Do you run an immortal business? I hope so. If you answered “no,” or even hesitated to be sure of your response, then you don’t think of your business as immortal. So when do you plan to shut it down? Most … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Managing Employees, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to The Immortal Business Goes on Forever

  1. David Basri says:

    In my head the answer to the question was an immediate “No”, because no business is immortal. That, however, is a completely separate question from, “Do you want your business to continue after you are gone or out of it”? Taking action to perpetuate a business may or may not succeed, but all entrepreneurs are used to that risk.

    There is no question that in most cases long term planning greatly increases the chance that a business will continue after the owner is gone. Then again, do not be afraid to jump if dump opportunistic luck comes along and someone offers a big chunk of money.

  2. Dane A. Shrallow says:

    I concur with your post. I’ve been involved in corporate practice, and the M&A field, for over 4 decades. One thing that is readily observable is that few businesses last forever. The vast majority have a finite life. Competition, evolving business models and disruptive technologies tend to take a toll. Want to own a retail store today? The primary focus of a business owner should be on how to preserve accumulated wealth for future generations. That could mean planning to keep the business in the family, at least for the next generation. But often the wiser choice is to realize your investment when the business’ future looks the brightest and capitalize on what you’ve built. In other words, sell when the business asset when its at its highest value, rather than at your scheduled retirement date. A lot can happen between now and then.

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