Tag Archives: employees

Millennial Employees: Why Their Opinion Counts

A couple of months ago I followed Jabez Le Bret‘s presentation about Millennial Employees on a national meeting agenda. He is an entertaining speaker and an excellent story teller. As every speaker hopes, one of his stories stuck with me. When Jabez (a Millennial … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

9 Responses to Millennial Employees: Why Their Opinion Counts

  1. Will Carter says:

    Two excellent blogs in consecutive weeks – wow – you are on a roll John!

    The motto for our drilling company is, “one team, one fight”. I have learned everyone can contribute in a positive way, if the culture is such in a company that encourages employees to think, no matter their season in life.

  2. Great message. Listening is one of several key ways to connect with Millennials. After working with about 10,000 of these early career employees, they definitely appreciate being heard.

  3. John Meetz says:

    Good one John and not even mention the Millennials are soon to be if not already the biggest segment of the workforce and along with that our biggest segment of customers and suppliers. I think we have no choice but to pay attention.

  4. Ray Champney says:

    Thought provoking John. It is important to keep in mind that while a millennial may be an employee they are also a reflection of what is trending in the marketplace. Opinions can result in exploring how a business might make adjustments to remain contemporary and position themselves as leaders in their field.

  5. Blair Koch says:

    Totally agree John. They want to participate and contribute.

  6. Mike Havel says:

    John, Totally agree. Listening is so important. We start all our meeting with a ” Good Things Report” and get a lot of good feed back from the new employees, that see our organization with an entirely new vision.

  7. Mike Wright says:

    John. It is interesting that the study of millennial is exposing truths that have always been there. For the last 50years, I have observed that you can build much stronger and better aligned teams if you listen to everyone. Some very great things come from observations of the new employee who sees things differently. If they are slightly off, then it provides you an opportunity to teach them something. They are more inclined to be open if they have initiated the conversation. Never miss a teaching opportunity or a learning opportunity.

  8. Mark Mehling says:

    Every group can contribute- but under the same rules as everyone else. The 2 ears/1 mouth rule of listen more than talking applies equally no matter your birthday. And every employee, no matter their hire date, should demonstrate the willingness to show up on time, work and contribute to a team, and work effectively without having to be babysat. That’s what builds up the respect that allows you to be critical. While millennials have issues, turns out we all do. Just don’t show up, knowing everything, not listening, performing poorly, and expect that you will get the other’s ear.

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History Begets Attitudes

History begets attitudes. I’m back from my biannual depressurization trip. This time it was to Central Europe. As always, I assess new and different things through a business owner’s eye. We visited five countries (Germany, Austria, Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary), … Continue reading

Posted in John's Opinions, Leadership | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to History Begets Attitudes

  1. Doug Roof says:

    Using the analogy between a handful of European countries and the population of small businesses is a great vehicle for driving home your argument for the importance of history in forming the attitude of a business, John. In so doing, you’ve offered a real thought-provoker to business owners/leaders. You’ve also given them an approach to open a conversation about company history and attitude with their employees. Thank you.

  2. Kelly Hall says:

    John:
    As usual – the master at work with your observations! Happy you are scheduling some depressurization time! Will use this nugget of wisdom on a client today!
    Kelly H.

  3. Kelly Hall says:

    Nice article!

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Business Buyers: The “Buy Now, Pay Later” Generation

If you are preparing to sell your business, your buyers will likely be members of the “buy now, pay later” generation. Generation X is the first demographic group to be raised in a culture that put little emphasis on savings. … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Exit Strategies, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Business Buyers: The “Buy Now, Pay Later” Generation

  1. This is one of the most realistic articles I’ve read on the topic. Sellers would be wise to listen to their advisors, and be advised earlier than they think they should.

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Time Bankruptcy and Communications Technology

A friend says that she hasn’t been able to tackle any new projects because she is in “time bankruptcy.” It expresses very well how she feels about her ability to control her schedule, but she has been claiming bankruptcy for … Continue reading

Posted in Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Time Bankruptcy and Communications Technology

  1. Does calendaring every minute of the day help?

  2. Mike Wright says:

    To solution may come in the difference between management and leadership. “Management is doing things right. Leadership is doing the right things.”Management’s purpose is to accomplish work efficiently. The phone can help this, but it also makes us spend more time ‘reacting’ to greatly increased stimuli. Leadership is responsible for setting direction and getting the things done that are most important to success. If we can get back more time to spend thinking, planning and acting strategically in a changing world we could accomplish more important things.

  3. Time bankruptcy – I lovge it. So true. Technology is one thing our behaviours another. Someone said to me once “What about if Bill Gates came before Alexander Bell. We are sending everything through email and Bell comes along and says; Don’t worry I’ve got this! I have invented a phone, you can get through to people straight away” Yeah right!

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Trust in Business and the Law

Every day, in almost every transaction, we rely on trust in business. We believe that a customer will pay us according to the terms of a sale. Our employees have access to money, goods and confidential information because we trust them. … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, John's Opinions, Leadership, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Trust in Business and the Law

  1. Don’t forget the cost of hiring CPAs and attorneys to help comply with the law.

  2. John Hyman says:

    Almost everyone knows the axiom “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction” but have you considered this when writing a politically biased and provocative article?

    Point #1- when in our lives have we ever had a body of Congressman that we actually trusted? And recent changes to the campaign laws they enacted only serve to promote their ability to retain office and the agendas of a select few with deep pockets to donate.

    Point #2- Why are laws enacted in the first place? Are you so naive as to believe there is an anti-small business cabal operating within the government? All you have to do is look at the recent Wells Fargo fiasco to see why government regulations are necessary. Greed and ego are almost usually at the heart of a scandal and when left unbridled there is an ugly side to capitalism.

    Government exists to protect its citizenry. Yes, it is easy to cite examples of overreach, and yes, it is often burdensome to small business owners. But imagine what our society would resemble with little to no oversight?

    Yes, I have become more reliant on laws, because trust is hard to find in corporate and political culture today.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Well John, I don’t see how you could say I’m biased unless you believe everything about one candidate and nothing about the other. And sorry, but I don’t agree that “They are all like that” is an acceptable justification. My “majority don’t trust” comment is the result of dozens of reputable polls. It is a fact, not an opinion. I have little respect for either “right wing attack journalism” or “the liberal media.”

      As to part 2- you are treading close to trolling territory. Who said anything remotely about a conspiracy, and why would I be naïve? Of course the government has a role in protecting it’s citizens. Another fact. Since the 1970s we’ve seen an explosion of new laws. My point is that they take the least common denominator and apply it to everyone. (How many of us really need a warning that hot coffee is hot?)

      I don’t often take on political issues in my column, but I also find it tough to ignore a topic that is brought up daily in my conversations with owners, which is a broad lack of enthusiasm for either one of the people who will be the next President. Last fact: a total of 9% of eligible voters cast their ballot for either Clinton or Trump in the primaries. A democracy gets the government it deserves.

  3. Mike Wright says:

    The stated purpose of Government is “to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence (sic), promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity,…” I don’t see that the points made are politically biased. I believe we should ask of all politicians, whether their actions are honestly motivated by this purpose or for their own personal interests. It is strongly held that the foundation of our uniquely American form of capitalistic system was made possible by trust that sprung from religious beliefs of our founders. We have moved away from spirituality, but it cannot move away from morality and its stated purpose. How can politician revise morality and redefine life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness every two, four or six years based upon the convenience of a simple majority of less that 70% of the people.

    As a business person with some financial understanding, it seems that every new citizen of the US (born or immigrating) is now assuming a debt of $ 60,000. This is to pay what our government has spent and continues to spend to insure they are reelected. My limited understanding is that this can only be paid back through business activity or spoils of war. The later is not currently palatable.
    Under the current political leadership our Gross National Product is not sufficient to sustain this in the future. I haven’t heard anything during this campaign that causes me to trust that the candidates can understand let alone solve the problems. How can we trust that the laws and regulations that they create will correct them. I want to trust! I want something better for my grandchildren and yours! We seem to be going further in the wrong direction!

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