Tag Archives: employees

Branch Mentality and Sanctuary Cities

Every multi-unit company suffers from branch mentality. I’ve worked with many, and no matter how much they promote a corporate culture and team spirit, branch mentality creeps in sometimes. It comes in two versions; the outposts’ attitude and the headquarter’s … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Branch Mentality and Sanctuary Cities

  1. John Lind says:

    In my other life, while being a Corporate person, I became completely entrenched in the Corporate philosophy based on expectations, performance, strategic direction, planning, bench mark standards, consistency of customer relations, product quality, performance guarantees, and team work and development of personnel. These points worked well and the Corporation met financial expectations in the marketplace and stayed ahead of the competition that was consistently on our heals. If there was a ‘sanctuary’ location it would have not worked… the same goes for cities that believe they should be ‘sanctuary’ city on the Federal dime. Cut off the Federal dime if they are allowed to maintain a ‘sanctuary’ city., Consistency should be paramount across the USA.

  2. Gordon Stuart says:

    John
    I think you left a key level off – that is multi – national. I used to work for an Australian Bank who we referred to as IAW – standing for “In Australia We” . This was how they started the sentence to talk down to you whether I was in London or Auckland.
    There is a whole subject here on cultural or market differences – my experience is Australia, NZ, UK, Canada and USA are all very different and despite being in the same industry you need to be careful with acquisitions!

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Exit Planning: Telling Secrets

Planning your exit from a business is a process of telling secrets. For many owners, it is the most terrifying part of selling. A rancher in South Texas once said to me, “I’m going to tell you a secret, and you … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Entrepreneurship, Exit Options, Exit Planning, Leadership, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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Bah Humbug! Remembering Mr. Fezziwig

To celebrate the holiday, I’m reprinting a post from 2012 about the underappreciated boss of A Christmas Carol, Mr. Fezziwig. I hope that you enjoy it. Merry Christmas! Last week was the 170th anniversary of the publication of Charles Dickens’ … Continue reading

Posted in Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Bah Humbug! Remembering Mr. Fezziwig

  1. Thank you John!

    Old Fezziwig has been a role model for me for years because of the way Scrooge explains to the ghost why Fezziwig was beloved. “He has the power to render us happy or unhappy; to make our service light or burdensome; a pleasure or a toil….The happiness he gives, is quite as great as if it cost a fortune.”

    What a privilege it is to give happiness to others!

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Protecting Your Best Asset

If you are planning your exit from the business, what is the best asset that you have to sell? Unless you have patented product, exclusive rights, or long-term customer contracts, you answer was likely “Our people.” Even if you have … Continue reading

Posted in Building Value, Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Leadership, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Protecting Your Best Asset

  1. David Cunningham says:

    John, You are spot on about the importance of being able to get your staff to support the transition. The process starts by finding out as much as you can about the buyer’s intentions for your employees. With that information you can plan for incentives that give employees who you believe are likely to be retained, a reason to make the transition work,and offer reasonable compensation to those who are likely to be terminated. The retained employees have a better attitude if they believe that the seller cared about those who did not fit the new owner’s plans. In one acquisition situation we debated how much money was appropriate and how it should be distributed. Our decision was that the employees had exceeded normal commitments to the company, particularly in the early stages and they deserved financial reward. We voted and arrived at 5% of the capital gain on the sale. These funds were allocated on a pro-rata basis of the employee’s accumulated base salary without allowance for bonuses. On this basis a secretary who had worked for 5 years at $30,000 per year and earned a total of $150,000 received the same amount as a VP of Sales who had worked 1 year and earned $150,000. Those employees who were retained in the transition were subject to vesting requirements. Those who were released were paid a month after termination. We considered a longer delay after termination to discourage defection to get a quick cash bonus, but the conditions offered by the buyer made it unlikely that retained employees would quit. This arrangement resulted in a smooth transition.

  2. Larry Amon says:

    The easiest thing to do is to share the profits of the company with your employees and to give them ownership before the sale. I was not planning to sell my company, but when the right offer came in I sold and my employees shared over a half a million dollars among 35 employees. 25 years later most still remain with the company..

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The Entrepreneurship Meritocracy

For those of us who compete in the entrepreneurship meritocracy, listening to the complaints of those who are employed can sometimes be irksome. I recently sat at an open table for an event. One of the other guests there was … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Entrepreneurship, Leadership, Managing Employees | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | 5 Comments

5 Responses to The Entrepreneurship Meritocracy

  1. Ray Cha says:

    Thanks John … always thought provoking.

  2. Doug Roof says:

    John,
    You always stimulate my thinking about my own business and career, as well as about the business owner clients I’ve known over the years. In this case, you flushed out an idea that is not unique, but probably underutilized across this country. There is much to be gained in understanding by having a mechanism whereby the entreprenuer can spend a day in the classroom with the teacher and, less often offered, the opportunity for the teacher to spend a day in the business with the entrepreneur. A widespread use of this practice might result in creative ideas for incremental improvements to our education system, as well as creative ideas for incremental improvements to the cultures of small businesses.

  3. John,
    Well said and I share your views. Living here in California I hear the same conversations and sometimes want to jump up and scream. I appreciate the article.

  4. Ron B. says:

    Another excellent article, John. You should consider publishing a compilation of these articles, and perhaps a subscription that yearly would provide updates, like “pocket parts” for legal publications. They are indeed thought provoking and succinct with each one providing a memorable “take away.” Thank you.

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