Tag Archives: politics

Trust in Business and the Law

Every day, in almost every transaction, we rely on trust in business. We believe that a customer will pay us according to the terms of a sale. Our employees have access to money, goods and confidential information because we trust them. … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, John's Opinions, Leadership, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Trust in Business and the Law

  1. Don’t forget the cost of hiring CPAs and attorneys to help comply with the law.

  2. John Hyman says:

    Almost everyone knows the axiom “For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction” but have you considered this when writing a politically biased and provocative article?

    Point #1- when in our lives have we ever had a body of Congressman that we actually trusted? And recent changes to the campaign laws they enacted only serve to promote their ability to retain office and the agendas of a select few with deep pockets to donate.

    Point #2- Why are laws enacted in the first place? Are you so naive as to believe there is an anti-small business cabal operating within the government? All you have to do is look at the recent Wells Fargo fiasco to see why government regulations are necessary. Greed and ego are almost usually at the heart of a scandal and when left unbridled there is an ugly side to capitalism.

    Government exists to protect its citizenry. Yes, it is easy to cite examples of overreach, and yes, it is often burdensome to small business owners. But imagine what our society would resemble with little to no oversight?

    Yes, I have become more reliant on laws, because trust is hard to find in corporate and political culture today.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Well John, I don’t see how you could say I’m biased unless you believe everything about one candidate and nothing about the other. And sorry, but I don’t agree that “They are all like that” is an acceptable justification. My “majority don’t trust” comment is the result of dozens of reputable polls. It is a fact, not an opinion. I have little respect for either “right wing attack journalism” or “the liberal media.”

      As to part 2- you are treading close to trolling territory. Who said anything remotely about a conspiracy, and why would I be naïve? Of course the government has a role in protecting it’s citizens. Another fact. Since the 1970s we’ve seen an explosion of new laws. My point is that they take the least common denominator and apply it to everyone. (How many of us really need a warning that hot coffee is hot?)

      I don’t often take on political issues in my column, but I also find it tough to ignore a topic that is brought up daily in my conversations with owners, which is a broad lack of enthusiasm for either one of the people who will be the next President. Last fact: a total of 9% of eligible voters cast their ballot for either Clinton or Trump in the primaries. A democracy gets the government it deserves.

  3. Mike Wright says:

    The stated purpose of Government is “to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence (sic), promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity,…” I don’t see that the points made are politically biased. I believe we should ask of all politicians, whether their actions are honestly motivated by this purpose or for their own personal interests. It is strongly held that the foundation of our uniquely American form of capitalistic system was made possible by trust that sprung from religious beliefs of our founders. We have moved away from spirituality, but it cannot move away from morality and its stated purpose. How can politician revise morality and redefine life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness every two, four or six years based upon the convenience of a simple majority of less that 70% of the people.

    As a business person with some financial understanding, it seems that every new citizen of the US (born or immigrating) is now assuming a debt of $ 60,000. This is to pay what our government has spent and continues to spend to insure they are reelected. My limited understanding is that this can only be paid back through business activity or spoils of war. The later is not currently palatable.
    Under the current political leadership our Gross National Product is not sufficient to sustain this in the future. I haven’t heard anything during this campaign that causes me to trust that the candidates can understand let alone solve the problems. How can we trust that the laws and regulations that they create will correct them. I want to trust! I want something better for my grandchildren and yours! We seem to be going further in the wrong direction!

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Generational Differences and Identity Politics

Generational differences are a hot topic for organizational behaviorists. Is this a real issue, or is it just the current management fad? “Never in history have we seen four generations together in the workplace.” That line starts thousands of articles … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Entrepreneurship, Exit Planning, Leadership, Managing Employees, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

2 Responses to Generational Differences and Identity Politics

  1. Eugenia says:

    The boomers and the millennials should appreciate the strength, knowledge and understanding of each generation, by so doing an effective structure can emerge which could yield high valuable growth and benefits for both generation.

  2. Bradley Chilcote says:

    I believe it all comes down to empathetic listening on each generational level. This takes active listening to another level where you connect with another’s core emotional being, in addition to understanding the message. Seek first to understand and apply the platinum rule (treat others the way they want to be treated). Working with multiple generations also requires informed leadership styles: not the leadership based on the “seat of your pants”, but leadership that is adapted based on the study and application of leadership principles. Yes, different generations are products of their political, economic, and cultural environments; but this isn’t a bad thing. It has been established through many studies that the more diverse a team is, the stronger it is!

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Extreme Democracy

Last week the British government announced that it was naming their new scientific research ship the RSS Sir David Attenborough, acting counter to the  people’s selection of “Boaty McBoatface,” despite that name being an overwhelming 3:1 favorite over the next closest choice. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Extreme Democracy

  1. Great post. Furthering this conversation, I highly recommended Dan Kennedys book: No B.S. Ruthless Management of People & Profits…..a word of warning you will need some thick skin, some honest self evaluation, and Clarity to really appreciate the valuable lessons taught in this book.

  2. David Basri says:

    Here, here! (with respect to our British forebearers).

  3. Martin Frey says:

    Well said. True freedom comes when we are obedient and submit to something greater than ourselves. Human are funny animal in search of transcendental joy yet they typically look for it in “things” and fleeting pleasures.

  4. Chris Christianson says:

    Very well said. Not all are qualified to lead and thus should be grateful to those that are!

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Too Busy to Do Business

Another tax filing season has passed, and the entire US accounting profession comes up for air. Of course, thousands of businesses and individuals have filed for extensions, thereby postponing the pain of calculating their final numbers for anywhere from a … Continue reading

Posted in Exit Options, Exit Planning, Leadership, Life After, Politics and Regulation, Selling a business, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Too Busy to Do Business

  1. Dan Bowser says:

    I love the title. When I was more active in my consulting practice and looking for additional clients, my best prospecting time was tax season. Business owners were unwilling to wait for advice and guidance. As a result, they left their CPA do the tax work and looked to me for the lucrative strategic planning and implementation. I love tax season.

  2. Mike Wright says:

    Excellent. Another thing to think about when I hear politicians talk about helping small business, and I know they have no concept of what small business is about.

  3. Ann says:

    Hi John,
    Great posts !
    Very interesting article thank you for posting !

  4. Great post John! I actually had a very similar conversation with a business owner only a couple of days ago on this topic. In Canada, our tax deadline is April 30th, so we have another week of our accountants being unavailable. You also hear so much about them working 80 hours a week, getting no sleep, rushing to meet deadlines, that it also begs the question as to how many mistakes are happening? Not intentionally, but only because of the time crunch and the pressure of the deadline. Realistically, as everyone talks about “added value” in our industry, you know that at tax time, this certainly isn’t happening.

    I agree with you that the governments need to come up with a new system for tax filing deadlines and not make it universally the same for every person. We’ve done it for businesses and base it on their fiscal year end, so why can’t it also be done for individuals?
    Thanks for a great read!

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Let the Business Owners Pay for It

When it comes to “No taxation without representation,” the rallying cry of our founding fathers, few identifiable population segments are as abused as business owners. One of my long-time clients is a franchisor, and until very recently I was a … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Entrepreneurship, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Let the Business Owners Pay for It

  1. Maryanne Guido says:

    Working with the City and County we are required to submit certified payroll, ensure our subcontractors submit THEIR certified payroll, and that subs certified they have been paid by us on a monthly basis. If sun fails to do do any of this the GC (we) do not get paid until we “make” each sub comply- or do it for them.

  2. Joani Gill says:

    John thanks for citing a few regulations that hinder business growth for small businesses. I believe our middle market companies suffer the same issues as they fight for their rights to thrive. Just a few years ago, The Association for Corporate Growth, a global organization focused on the middle market, began a grass roots campaign to become the voice on Capital Hill for this business sector. I urge readers to check out ACG.ORG or MIDDLEMARKETVOICE.ORG and see where they can help with this initiative and be heard collectively. CONTACT AMBER LANDIS, VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC POLICY, AT ALANDIS@ACG.ORG.

  3. When is it time to get rid of the red tape and bureaucrats?

  4. Cathy Locke says:

    Since I am a small business and mainly wholesale to small and medium size businesses I honestly don’t feel I have a “snowball in hell” chance of making ends meet or even show a profit. I also feel we need to clean house with the red tape and bureaucrats.

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