Tag Archives: startups

Dear President Elect Trump

Dear President Elect Trump; Congratulations on your election. Clearly there is a strong sentiment for change in the United States, and it appears that you are the beneficiary. I hope that supporting small business, the engine of job creation and innovation … Continue reading

Posted in John's Opinions, Leadership, Managing Employees, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 19 Comments

19 Responses to Dear President Elect Trump

  1. Right to the point!!! Perfectly stated of a perfectly chosen subject.

  2. Beth says:

    I would agree that he may not have suffered the same as the “typical” small business owner. Not fair to disqualify him as a business owner though. I would definitely qualify him as different. History will probably suggest the same.

    • Ron B. says:

      I agree with you that indeed he is a business owner, though not a “typical” small guy, and definitely of a “different” breed. He grew up as part of the “privileged” society rather than “typical.” Was sent to military school for discipline training by his father, likely an impatient man, where he thrived rather than succumb to being under control. During an interview on a national morning news program prior to the election, his son boldly proclaimed his father’s diminished poll numbers only made him more determined because he was always the ultimate “winner.”

  3. David Cunningham says:

    Well meaning politicians often ask me, “What does small business need?” My replies have always been about specifics for Colorado. Your letter paints a broader, better, picture. Could you send a copy of the letter to every member of Congress?

  4. Beth says:

    It is a great letter minus politics, well done.

  5. Carl Strobel says:

    Superb and thoughtful reasoning.

  6. Will Carter says:

    Excellent! Could not agree more about the solution to immigration – we need a work force, just make it legal.

  7. Geoff says:

    Great letter, John! Nothing but truth, and straight to the point. Although many small business owners are not adversely affected by estate tax due to current exemptions, it would be nice if a lifetime of work and wealth accumulation faced no penalty due to the certain eventuality of death.

  8. Tom Letourneau says:

    John,
    You wrote what we’re all thinking. I just hope our Representatives in Washington (and at the state level) can understand the simplicity of success: let business do business and don’t hamstring us with undue regulation!

  9. Tracey Cheek says:

    Love this so much, I posted to LinkedIn. Thanks for sharing!

  10. Rodney Fischer says:

    In your letter to Trump, you say that he “is no different” than those in Washington who have never actually been business owners. I am wondering if this was a mistake. He may not have “started from scratch” but he has employees. He has financial statements and budgets. He has had the stress of failed businesses, dealings with employees, and over-regulated development hurdles. He has unbelievable financial risks with every “Tower” he develops. I am pretty certain he has people suing him daily considering the number of employees and customers he has.

    As a second-generation business owner, I have had a lot set in my lap (not nearly as much as Trump, though!) with which to continue running a business. I will tell you I get idiots telling me I had everything handed to me. And I want to kick their ass! When the banker calls a special meeting to discuss financial ratios, there are no hand-outs. When the employee you trained and nurtured works their way up the ladder to become a manager…..and then steals from you, there is nothing easy about terminating the person and affecting their family’s income source. When a new competitor comes to town that will drastically affect business, there is no sleep. It is true that starting with a pile of $$ makes it easier to keep things running INITIALLY, but in the end, incompetent leadership will result in the same ending. In the end, maintaining the legacy of your father has it’s own pressure!

    So, for all of his personality flaws, let’s not insult the man more by grouping him in with the people in Washington that do not have a clue how to balance a budget, who fail to acknowledge that tighter border control would make our families safer, and who refuse to live by the same rules and regulations as the rest of the country. He is better equipped intellectually and experientially than any of those people. And, quite honestly, their characters are probably not much better – they just don’t have the entire liberal media probing the depths of the closet in which their skeletons reside.

    • John F. Dini says:

      Good point, Rodney. Just because someone had a hand up doesn’t mean he/she isn’t a business owner. Pardon my myopia about the glories of no resources. Hard Knocks is a school, but it’s not the only school.

  11. Mike Wright says:

    The Greatest thing about America is that it has been the land of opportunity, not the land of give aways. Several of these point are severely important in this regard. We should focus on how to give people back opportunities, and support them. The disintegration of the middle can and must be checked. A society that is divided into givers and takers does not fulfill one of our most important rights ” the pursuit of happiness “.

  12. Daniel Kearns says:

    Well said John!

  13. Carl Grimes says:

    Excellent! Thanks for your thoughts.

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Let the Business Owners Pay for It

When it comes to “No taxation without representation,” the rallying cry of our founding fathers, few identifiable population segments are as abused as business owners. One of my long-time clients is a franchisor, and until very recently I was a … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Entrepreneurship, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

4 Responses to Let the Business Owners Pay for It

  1. Maryanne Guido says:

    Working with the City and County we are required to submit certified payroll, ensure our subcontractors submit THEIR certified payroll, and that subs certified they have been paid by us on a monthly basis. If sun fails to do do any of this the GC (we) do not get paid until we “make” each sub comply- or do it for them.

  2. Joani Gill says:

    John thanks for citing a few regulations that hinder business growth for small businesses. I believe our middle market companies suffer the same issues as they fight for their rights to thrive. Just a few years ago, The Association for Corporate Growth, a global organization focused on the middle market, began a grass roots campaign to become the voice on Capital Hill for this business sector. I urge readers to check out ACG.ORG or MIDDLEMARKETVOICE.ORG and see where they can help with this initiative and be heard collectively. CONTACT AMBER LANDIS, VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC POLICY, AT ALANDIS@ACG.ORG.

  3. When is it time to get rid of the red tape and bureaucrats?

  4. Cathy Locke says:

    Since I am a small business and mainly wholesale to small and medium size businesses I honestly don’t feel I have a “snowball in hell” chance of making ends meet or even show a profit. I also feel we need to clean house with the red tape and bureaucrats.

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Time to Grow Up

Young industries no longer have the time to grow up. The cycle of maturation has long been accepted as  a fact of life when a new concept becomes a business. There are a few pioneers (defined here in Texas as … Continue reading

Posted in Business Perspectives, Marketing and Sales, Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

3 Responses to Time to Grow Up

  1. John Meetz says:

    WOW what are we doing in the TAB business? Are board meetings and coaching sessions obsolete? Maybe they should all be done on SKYPE! Is the ExitMap engagement a dream beyond the basic assessment, appraisal, and action reports – do they really have time or want a consultant in the process?

    • John F. Dini says:

      John,
      Most TAB members have no intention of building a national market-dominating player. As I said in the beginning of the piece, there’s always room for hundreds of differentiated small companies. In the past, some of those would grow up to be regional players, then national ones. The odds of that happening are much longer now.

  2. Richard H says:

    Couldn’t possibly disagree more. I assume that’s the response you were expecting.

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The Quest for Recurring Revenue

Recurring revenue is the current Holy Grail of business. Barriers to Entry, a traditional way of assessing your differentiation against competition, have been replaced by Barriers to Exit, how to make it at least inconvenient or at most excruciatingly painful for … Continue reading

Posted in Customer Relations, Economic Trends, Entrepreneurship, Marketing, Marketing and Sales, Sales, Strategy and Planning | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to The Quest for Recurring Revenue

  1. I am striving to achieve different recurring revenue streams over time, so I will check out the book, The Automatic Customer by John Warrillow.

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Minimum Wage and the Middle Class

“Amongst the novel objects that attracted my attention during my stay in the United States, nothing struck me more forcibly than the general equality of conditions.” – Alexis De Tocqueville (Democracy in America, 1831) Americans have always considered themselves “middle … Continue reading

Posted in Economic Trends, Entrepreneurship, Managing Employees, Politics and Regulation, Strategy and Planning, Technology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

One Response to Minimum Wage and the Middle Class

  1. Mike Wright says:

    The only real way to solve the problem of the shrinking middle class is through technological advances and higher levels of universal education. Governments at all levels have failed to provide the education required and continue to take more money away from the private sector. Money that could be used to develop new technologies and train their workers to move into higher paying jobs. They are taking actions to get the political support of those who cannot, or choose not to, understand that their simplistic approaches will fail. The envy of astronomically higher salaries of CEO’s are playing right into their political strategies that are definitely not “for the people”.

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